Concurrent Enrollment FAQ

  • What is Concurrent Enrollment (CE)?
  • Who is eligible to take SLCC Concurrent Enrollment?
  • How much does it cost?
  • How difficult are Concurrent Enrollment classes?
  • What is the difference between Concurrent Enrollment and Advanced Placement?
  • What is the difference between Concurrent Enrollment and Early Enrollment?
  • What is Concurrent Enrollment @ Salt Lake Community College (CE@SLCC)?
  • What are Interactive Video Conferences (IVC) and Hybrid Courses Offered through Snow College?
  • Who Teaches Concurrent Enrollment at the high schools?
  • What is next to get started with taking concurrent enrollment classes?
  • Can I transfer the credits to a college or university of my choice?
  • Sophomore (10th grade) Appeals
  • Placement Testing Overview
  • Course Prerequisites
  • About Placement Tests
  • Admissions

What is Concurrent Enrollment (CE)?

Salt Lake Community College and Snow College Concurrent Enrollment Programs have partnered with Vanguard Academy to extend the privilege of college-level coursework to motivated high school students. Upon successful completion of each course, students can earn both high school and college credit.

 

Who is eligible to take SLCC Concurrent Enrollment?

Concurrent Enrollment is open to high school juniors and seniors with a minimum of a “B” grade point average and/or an ACT composite score of 22 or higher. Sophomores may be eligible based upon a minimum GPA of B+ and a recommendation from their high school counselor. Students must be ready for the additional rigor and work outside of class that is required to be successful in a college-level course. Compared to most high school classes, Concurrent Enrollment classes will go into greater depth, require more work and offer greater challenge.

 

How much does it cost?

High School students who are not already admitted must first apply to Snow College before they can enroll in Concurrent Enrollment classes. There is a $30 application fee when you apply to become a Snow College student. If you have already taken Snow College classes and have a Badger ID number, you do not need to apply again. Students wishing to take math and/or science courses are required to take the ACT test with appropriate scores.

 

All Utah colleges and universities which offer Concurrent Enrollment (CE) courses, including Snow College, charge a minimal tuition fee of $5 per credit hour for CE courses ($15 for a 3 credit hour class and $20 for a 4 credit hour class).

 

Check your account on Badger Web for Snow College or Mypage for SLCC to make sure you do not owe for tuition which could block you from enrolling in future classes. Payments can be made online by logging into college account.

 

How difficult are Concurrent Enrollment classes?

The standards are equivalent to those of the same course taught on campus. Compared to most high school classes, concurrent enrollment classes will go into greater depth, require more work and offer greater challenge. They may make considerable demands on your time to complete required work outside of class time and also on your ability to conceptualize, understand hidden meanings and draw conclusions from reading and research. These are the same challenges that you would accept when enrolling in a college or university. You should be prepared for rigorous academic work and more stringent grading standards than those to which you may be accustomed. Concurrent enrollment is a good way for students to learn the difference between high school and college courses and requirements.

 

What is the difference between Concurrent Enrollment and Advanced Placement?

Concurrent Enrollment students are admitted as college students and registered for classes at SLCC. They earn their grades by completing assignments and taking tests during the course. Grades are recorded on a permanent SLCC transcript. There is a one-time admission application fee, and then students may take up to 12 Concurrent Enrollment credit hours per semester. Concurrent Enrollment courses count as credit for degrees awarded by SLCC.  Advanced Placement (AP) students must obtain qualifying scores on the AP test given at the end of successful completion of the AP course in order to get college credit. Each AP test costs approximately $80.  AP test scores may be sent to multiple colleges and universities. Each college or university determines the number of credit hours awarded for each AP test, and which scores qualify for college credit.

What is the difference between Concurrent Enrollment and Early Enrollment?

Concurrent Enrollment classes are funded by the state, so students pay a reduced tuition of $5 per credit hour ($15 for a 3 credit hour class and $20 for a 4 credit hour class). Students who are admitted as Concurrent Enrollment students are eligible to take only courses that are designated as Concurrent Enrollment classes. Traditional Concurrent Enrollment classes are taught by high school teachers in the high schools. A few Concurrent Enrollment classes are offered on the college campus or over the internet.

 

Juniors and Seniors who wish to take a wider variety of classes than those offered through Concurrent Enrollment may be admitted through the Early Enrollment admission process. Early Enrollment students take classes on the college campus and pay tuition, fees, and the cost of books. Credit earned through Early Enrollment may count for both college and high school credit; however, students must meet with their high school counselor regarding acceptance of these credits toward high school graduation. Once students are admitted as Early Enrollment students, they are still eligible to take Concurrent Enrollment classes.

What is Concurrent Enrollment @ Salt Lake Community College (CE@SLCC)?

Salt Lake Community College provides an opportunity for a limited number of high school students to take Concurrent Enrollment classes at the SLCC campus. CE@SLCC enables students to take reduced-tuition classes during the school year in the evenings and during the summer. Students receive credit toward high school graduation and a college degree at the same time. Students must demonstrate college readiness with appropriate placement test scores.

 

What are Interactive Video Conferences (IVC) and Hybrid Courses Offered through Snow College?

Snow College uses Internet Video Conferencing (IVC, or also called EdNet) to broadcast a number of courses each semester to various high schools around the state as concurrent enrollment courses. In this case, it is a Snow College instructor teaching the class to several high school locations around the state on live interactive video. Each high school must determine which classes to offer based on scheduling.

Review the IVC schedule at https://www.snow.edu/academics/concurrent/ and talk with your counselor about which courses you want to take. Each high school selects which courses it wants to make available to its students. Counselors at each high school will decide which classes to make available based partly upon student interest, so students should discuss and plan with their counselors in which courses they may have interest. Courses at each high school may be delivered:

  • face-to-face by a high school teacher who has the qualifications needed to conduct the course for college credit,
  • over live Interactive Video Conferencing (IVC) by a Snow College instructor teaching from Ephraim or Richfield,
  • as a Hybrid section utilizing recordings of IVC classes in a way that students stay on the same pace during the semester as students participating in the same class live, or
  • as an Online course: BUS 1600, NURP 1000, PE 1096.

 

Hybrid Concurrent Enrollment (HCE) is an integral part of Snow College’s Interactive Video Conference (IVC) program delivered statewide to Utah high schools. HCE serves as a flexible way for some students to participate in CE courses which they would not otherwise be able to take because of scheduling problems.

 

The lectures from every Snow IVC course are recorded. In HCE courses, each recording will be made available to students enrolled in the Hybrid section of the class about an hour after the lecture is completed. Students in the Hybrid section will have a scheduled time at their high schools when they watch the recording before the next lecture in the course is presented. In this way, HCE students will stay current with the work being done in the IVC section (i.e. assignments will be due at the same time for Hybrid students as they are for IVC students).

Here are specifics on the way the HCE program will operate:

  1. Students must meet the same qualifications as all concurrent enrollment students (3.0 GPA or 22 ACT Composite Score).
  2. The student is required to occupy one regular period in his/her high school schedule in order to watch the lecture either on the same day of the lecture (preferred) or before the next lecture is given.
  3. Students must watch recorded IVC lectures (using headphones) in a regular, designated location in the high school, such as a computer lab, and at the same time and on the same days each week. Students cannot plan to watch the recorded lectures at a time outside their normal high school schedule.
  4. In order to provide the student as much flexibility as possible when scheduling the class into his/ her high school day, recorded lectures will normally be available an hour following the end of the live IVC class. Multiple students in the same HCE class at a high school do not need to schedule the same period to watch recordings. The far right column in the chart below indicates the EARLIEST time that students should plan on lecture recordings being available.
  5. The high school is required to monitor students viewing the lectures daily and to proctor any exams as needed. This monitor will keep a record of attendance which will be sent to the course instructor.
  6. Access to the recording will be embedded in Canvas. In order to maintain the interactive component of courses, professors will normally require Discussion Board posts during or after each lecture to ensure engagement and understanding of lecture subject matter.
  7. HCE section assignments will have the same due dates and times as the live IVC section from which the lecture is recorded. Assignment submittals will normally be made through Canvas.
  8. Students are encouraged to take classes face-to-face at their high schools or over IVC whenever possible. HCE is the third-best alternative and should be used ONLY when a student is unable to schedule the course face-to-face or on IVC. HCE courses will keep the same pace, rigor, interactivity and integrity as the course delivered over live IVC broadcasts.

Who Teaches Concurrent Enrollment at the high schools?

Often times it is a high school teacher who you are already familiar with that teaches a class, or it is an interactive video conference with an actual college professor located on the college campus that you watch and interface with live. The courses taught at high schools are the same as the courses taught on the college campus. Course curriculum, textbooks, assignments, exams and grading requirements are the same.

 

What is next to get started with taking concurrent enrollment classes?

Start by talking with your school counselor. Your counselor can help you determine if you are ready for the challenge of a college course. As with honors and AP classes, students best suited for college-level work are those already excelling in the particular subject area, and in their coursework overall.

 

Your counselor will also know:

  • Which college classes you can take
  • Whether a college class also satisfies your high school graduation requirements.
  • If the course you want to take will advance you on the pathway you want to take or move you toward the college degree you want to earn.
  • Whether there are any requirements or restrictions you need to be aware of.
  • Which colleges allow high school students to take classes and how to enroll.

Can I transfer the credits to a college or university of my choice?

If your goal is to earn college credit, make sure the college courses you take are transferable to most other colleges. Some community college courses are more remedial and are not accepted for credit at a four-year college. If you are taking AP classes in high school, make sure that any college classes you take don’t overlap. Most colleges will not award college credit for both an AP exam and a college class in the same subject. Your counselor can help you sort out these things.

 

All concurrent enrollment courses earned from Snow College count toward a degree at Snow College as major, general education or elective credit. It is up other colleges and universities in the Utah System of Higher Education, plus BYU, Westminster College or other private colleges, whether or not they accept credits from other institutions. Institutions in other states likewise determine the application of transfer credit. There is no guarantee that Concurrent Enrollment classes will satisfy general education or major requirements at other institutions. It is recommended that students planning to transfer credits seek academic advising at the college or university they plan to attend.

 

Students who complete an Associate of Science (AS) or Associate of Arts (AA) degree may transfer that degree to any college or university and all credits earned will transfer as a package rather than be considered individually. Students earning a General Studies Certificate of Completion may also transfer the certificate as a package for completion of general education requirements.

 

You can get an idea of how credits may transfer between Utah colleges by visiting http://www.transferutah.org/, but still talk over transfer possibilities with your counselor.

 

 

Sophomore (10th grade) Appeals: 

Utah Board of Regents Policy states that students must have junior or senior standing, with sophomores by exception, to take Concurrent Enrollment classes. As a sophomore, you will complete the 10th Grade Appeal Form seeking an exception to the rule.

 

As a sophomore, you must meet course prerequisites. The concurrent course must align with your SEOP/CCRP. Completing an advanced secondary program such as ALP or honors classes does not guarantee an appeal will be approved. SLCC academic departments reserve the right to designate particular Concurrent Enrollment courses to be open only to 11th or 12th grade students, without exception. Sophomore students seeking approval for math courses may appeal to the Concurrent Enrollment math liaison by submitting official Accuplacer, SAT, or ACT qualifying score and letters of recommendation from the Concurrent Enrollment math instructor and previous math instructor.

 

To make an appeal, on the form you will write the reasons you feel you are academically and socially ready and should be allowed an exception to the rule and then add your signature. You will obtain the CE teacher’s recommendation and signature. And, you will obtain the CE coordinator or counselor’s signature.

 

You may submit sophomore appeals several months before taking the course. If you have already been admitted to the college, please include your college student number on the appeal form (admission is not required for submitting the appeal form).

 

Placement Testing Overview

Placement testing helps determine whether or not you are adequately prepared to take certain college level courses and are a prerequisite for several concurrent enrollment classes (see Course Prerequisites for more information). Once a student has been admitted to SLCC and receives their S Number, they are eligible to take the Accuplacer test.

 

Course Pre-Requisites

Many concurrent enrollment courses have prerequisites or requirements that need to be met before you are eligible to take the course. Counselors, coordinators, and teachers will help you know if you are qualified for courses at your high school. If you cannot provide a qualifying score to the instructor at the beginning of the class you cannot remain in the class. There are three types of prerequisites:

 

  1. Class Status Prerequisites

Some classes are only available to seniors, others to both juniors and seniors, and others allow sophomores by exception. For a complete list of courses with class status prerequisites at SLCC,  see the Class Status Prerequisites table (http://www.slcc.edu/concurrentenrollment/students/InfoGuide-CoursePrerequisites.aspx). For more information about Sophomore (10th grade) Exceptions at SLCC, visit the Sophomore Appeals page (http://www.slcc.edu/concurrentenrollment/students/InfoGuide-SophomoreAppeals.aspx).

 

 

  1. Course Prerequisites

Some classes must be taken in sequential order. For example, you must take and successfully pass Spanish 1010 before taking Spanish 1020. Some sequence classes also have grade requirements, meaning you must complete the first class with a minimum grade before moving on to the next class. For a complete list of courses with course prerequisites, visit the SLCC Concurrent Enrollment Course Offerings page (http://www.slcc.edu/concurrentenrollment/CourseOfferings/index.htm) or the Snow College Course Descriptions page (https://www.snow.edu/academics/concurrent/ce_course_descriptions.html)

 

  1. Test Scores Prerequisites

Placement testing helps determine whether or not you are adequately prepared to take certain college level courses. The placement tests which are accepted at SLCC are ACT, SAT, and Accuplacer. SLCC and Snow College must have official ACT or SAT scores on file or the student must have completed the Accuplacer to be eligible for placement into certain courses. LOEP scores do not count as qualifying scores.  Student must have either the ACT, SAT, or CPT/Accuplacer scores.  Snow College requires an ACT score before accepting the Accuplacer score. Talk with your high school counselor to find out if the college has a copy of your test scores on file.

 

 

About Placements Tests

ACT and SAT: ACT and SAT are national college entrance exams that are offered at high schools and other testing sites. If you wish to use ACT or SAT scores to meet placement requirements, make sure that SLCC has an official copy of your scores. If you don’t request the scores to be sent to SLCC when you take the test, you will have to have an official copy sent from your high school or from the testing company.

 

Accuplacer: Many students use the Accuplacer Assessment to meet placement prerequisites. The test is administered at several of our campuses and offered at some high schools. It is done on a computer and the results are immediately added to your SLCC records. The cost of the first test is included in the admission fee. The SLCC Testing Center has compiled important information concerning the test. Please check the link above for hours, what you need to bring, the number of retakes allowed and links to internet review web sites and practice tests.

 

Expiration of Tests and Prerequisites

Placement test scores need to be current. Math tests or pre-requisite courses are valid for one year. English test scores do not expire. Students who have completed a math course prerequisite with a grade of ‘C’ or higher within one year may register for the next level math course without retaking the placement test. Students who have completed an English course prerequisite with a grade of ‘C’ or higher within 10 years may register for the next level English course. The college credit is permanent, but using the course as a prerequisite has a time limit.

 

Admissions

Admission to SLCC is required before you can register for SLCC CE courses. Before you apply for admission be sure you qualify to take concurrent enrollment classes. To apply for admission you will need to fill out the admission application online and pay a $40.00 non-refundable (SLCC) or a $30.00 non-refundable (Snow College) admission and processing fee with a credit card for each college you take courses. You only need to complete the SLCC admissions application one time.

 

Before You Apply to SLCC

Before you begin filling out the online SLCC admission application you will need to gather the following items:

  • A credit card in order to pay the one-time $40 admission fee (unless you opt to pay with cash or check using one of the two methods mentioned above),
  • Your state SSID number.  It begins with either the number 1 or 2 and is a seven digit number. If you do not know your SSID number, ask your high school counselor or administrator for it.
  • Optional:  Your social security number (SSN).
  • An email address.
  • The approval of your parent or guardian.

 

Before You Apply to Snow College

Before you begin filling out the online Snow College admission application you will need to gather the following items:

  • A credit card in order to pay the one-time $30 admission fee (unless you have been given an waiver code),
  • Your social security number (SSN).
  • An email address.
  • A cell phone number.
  • The approval of your parent or guardian.

 

 

Utah Residency Application Questions

Questions in the application concerning your Utah residency will not affect your eligibility to take Concurrent Enrollment classes. Your answers will be used to determine how much tuition you will pay if you decide to take regular college classes after high school or through the Early Enrollment program.

 

SLCC Student ID Number

When you have completed your application and paid the $40 fee, Enrollment Services will send you an acceptance letter with your SLCC Student ID number or “S number”. You should receive your letter within a week.  Keep your S number in a secure place. You will need your S number to access your SLCC records through your SLCC MyPage account.

 

Snow College Student ID Number

When you have completed your application and paid the $30 fee, Enrollment Services will send you an acceptance email with your Snow College Student ID number or “Badger ID”. You should receive your email within 24 hours.  Keep your Badger ID in a secure place. You will need your Badger ID to access your Snow College records through your Snow College Badger Web account.

 

Conclusion:    Get started today!

Schedule an appointment with your high school counselor and find out more about the classes that are available. After all, it is never too early to set your educational goals and what you want to do in the future. It you have the time and the energy, taking a college class can be fun and rewarding. Once you have a taste of college, you may feel that you can hardly wait for your college life to start!